Cold Calling – Risky Sometimes Profitable Strategy

One strategy many poker players may not be totally familiar with is cold calling. In a nutshell, cold calling is when a call after at least two actions have been made including a raise, before your turn to fold, raise or bet. For example, if one player bets, another player raises, and you call, this would be considered cold calling. For a player to bet in the first place is indicative they think they have a good hand and for someone to raise they think it is even better. To cold call is to bet in this round but it is not a time for a marginal maybe type hand and certainly not a time to bluff.
A great example is when you in the middle position of the table with an unsuited king and queen and an early postion player raises. Do you call in this case. There are several scenarios that can take out some risk. How has the player been playing. Check out their chip stack as well as your own. In general if they have been doing well they might continue to do so and it would be good to fold. If it is a player who goes all-in all the time and loses frequently or a loose player, it might be a good time to bet. You might have a hunch it will work. Again this is another time to bet as well. And if you have been doing well it might be a great time to bet as well.
Some might consider the king queen to be a good enough starting hand to cold call a raise with, though many poker players will pass on this one round even with a good position. This is the gist of poker though and sometimes you will win and other times you will lose. This is a great way for the raiser to accumulate chips as well. Since many players will fold when there is a raise. Have you ever seen a raiser who only has a pair of twos. But they add to their chip stack anyway.
If you make the call anyways, you maybe put into a difficult post-flop position. For example, let’s say that the flop was ace, queen, ten unsuited, which isn’t bad for you because you paired the queen with a king for a kicker. However, you also have to deal with the possibility that your opponent has ace king , and they now have a straight. Of course, they could have pocket jacks as well, and this will take knowing your fellow players in order to decide if it’s worth calling against any future bets. One strategy is to raise and feel out fellow players. If they re-raise, they might have something. Since sometimes players raise with any pairs as mentioned above, but will fold if they have say a pair of eights. The choice is yours. If you find them re-raising your re-raise then they might have a trump hand.
To be successful cold calling, you need a great hand, and weak opponents.

Gordon Vayo Out as Qui Nguyen Wins WSOP 2016 Main Event and Gets First Bracelet

Starting the final table of the WSOP 2016 Main Event by playing aggressively has paid off well for Qui Nguyen. He won the event and the $8 million dollar first place prize and bracelet. Though it wasn’t always smooth sailing, he pulled out a win which has become expected for those who play aggressively.
He came into the final table winning small to medium and several large pots against Gordon Vayo who was second in chip count and Gordon Josephy who was third. Josephy came out early moving up but his rise was crimped by Vayo who was dealt some strong hands as Josephy doubled up. He was left short stacked. He rallied for a bit till being eliminated by Vayo. Josephy took home $3.5 million for his work. This set the stage for Nguyen and Vayo.
The heads up match was long at 8 hours with many twists and turns. Vayo had gotten the chip lead briefly but that was changed after half an hour. The two battled back and forth till Nguyen took control. He went all-in on the river and Vayo folded with 80,000,000 chips on the table. Later Nguyen took another chunk of chips leaving Vayo weakened.
Nguyen continued to build on his lead eventually winning with a pair of kings against Vayo’s jack – ten spades combination.
Highlights of the tournament are in the video below.

Nguyen’s win highlights the effects of aggression in poker. If you sit at a table, you see it all the time. Players who raise often, even with questionable hands, often come out ahead.
Qui Nguyen is a Vietnamese who settled in California working in a nail salon before leaving for Las Vegas in 2007. He started by playing limit holdem cash games but went to no limit and had only a few cashes in small events. His only WSOP cash was in 2009 for less than $10,000. When the final hand came around, Nguyen won with a pair of kings against Vayo’s 10-jack combination. This shows the possiblities in poker that you don’t have to be Phil Ivey or a well known figure to win the WSOP.
Nguyen won his seat through a satellite tournament. Satellite tournaments are a great way to enter larger bigger payoff tournaments.

The WSOP 2016 Main Event results were:
Qui Nguyen $8,005,310
Gordon Vayo $4,661,228
Cliff Josephy $3,453,035
Michael Ruane $2,576,003
Vojtech Ruzicka $1,935,288
Kenny Hallaert $1,464,258
Griffin Benger $1,250,190
Jerry Wong $1,100,076
Fernando Pons $1,000,000
For most of the players, this is a high point of the poker career. Nguyen had his largest cash at this event. His previous top finish was $9000 and he earned his first bracelet. It’s rare to have repeat winners who place tops in the Main Event over and over.

Qui Nguyen Continues Table Domination in Day Two of the WSOP 2016 Final Table

On day two of the WSOP Final Table, Qui Nguyen continued his table domination to nearly 200,000,000 chips. He played aggressive, winning medium pots and he got one large pot against Ruane, who he eliminated with an ace – jack combination. Nguyen didn’t start off so well though. He doubled up and lost to Ruane with pocket sixes against Ruane’s pocket eights. Nonetheless, he still retained control of the board.
At one point in the tournament, Vayo held the chip lead. He eliminated Ruzicka with a pair of eights against a ace – king combination from Ruzicka who also bluffed.
The remaining three will battle it out for the last of the series. The chip counts of the remaining players are:
Nguyen 197,600,000
Vayo 89,000,000
Josephy 50,000,000